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Reception

Reception year is also known as the Early Years Foundation Stage.

We have one Reception class

Mrs Coombes Mrs Peters
RCP Class RCP Class
 

Topic Summer 1 - Why do ladybirds have spots?

Incy wincy spider climbed up the waterspout! Why do ladybirds have spots? Why do spiders spin webs? It’s time to find out more about minibeasts and their habitats.

This half term, we’ll visit a local park to carry out a minibeast safari! Magnifying glasses clutched firmly in hands, we’ll look under logs, leaves and stones for creatures that wriggle, crawl or fly. We’ll find out about minibeast habitats, features and colours, and compare them. Observing snails in a tank, we’ll think about how they move. Can we move like that too? We’ll also move like ants, working together to collect and carry objects to move and rebuild a structure, piece by piece. To get to know these creepy crawlies better, we’ll make and monitor a mini wormery, minibeast hotel and a butterfly garden. Can we predict what will be these minibeasts’ favourite foods? In our literacy sessions, we’ll use sequential vocabulary to retell stories, and write a story from the perspective of a spider. In our mathematics sessions, we’ll predict and count ladybird spots and compare the lengths of caterpillars made from cubes, counters and beads. Getting creative, we’ll make leaf confetti, minibeast finger puppets, and learn to waggle dance like a bee.

At the end of the project, we’ll invite you to an assembly where we’ll share our learning with you. We’ll also make brightly-coloured pebble beetles and give them scientific names.

Help your child prepare for their project
Minibeasts are marvellous! Why not visit your local pet shop together and take a look at some exotic minibeasts. Can you find out what countries they came from? You could also try worm charming in your garden. Put a large hoop on an area of earth, water the area with a watering can, and tap your fingers lightly on the ground. Can you entice any worms to the surface? Alternatively, read minibeast-themed stories together, such as Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar and The Bad-Tempered Ladybird, to find out more about these incredible creatures.

Memorable experience Minibeast safari
Innovate challenge Butterfly garden
CLD Listening and attention; Understanding; Speaking
PD Moving and handling
PSED Self-confidence and self-awareness; Managing feelings and behaviour; Making relationships
English Reading; Writing
Maths Numbers; Shape, space and measures
World The world; Technology
Exp A&D Exploring and using media and materials; Being imaginative

Topic Summer 2 - Do cows drink milk?

Old Macdonald had a farm, e-i-e-i-o! Do cows drink milk? What are baby pigs called? It’s time to find out more about life on the farm and the animals that live there.

This half term, we’ll be visiting a local farm to take in the sights, sounds and smells. We’ll observe the different farm animals, crops and vehicles, and maybe even take a ride on a tractor! Back in the classroom, we’ll monitor beans as they grow, noting how they change. In our literacy lessons, we’ll make predictions about stories and try out some farmyard rhymes. We’ll create songs about the farm to sing as we shake our homemade seed shakers in time. In our mathematics lessons, we’ll use an animal ‘baa chart’ to estimate the number of popular farmyard animals, and we’ll use addition and subtraction to help Little Bo Beep count her sheep. Outside once more, we’ll take it in turns to be sheepdogs, sheep and farmers. Can we herd all of our sheep into the pen? Getting creative, we’ll use coloured play dough and clay to create farmyard scenarios, and ‘paint’ farm animals using graphics software. Then, we’ll design and make delicious flavoured breads to sell in our very own farm shop!

At the end of the project, we’ll invite you into school to share our best bits. We’ll write funny farmyard stories and compile a letter to send to the farm we visited, explaining what we’ve learned.

Help your child prepare for their project
Farms are fantastic! Why not explore your kitchen cupboards together and talk about where different foods come from? Do you have any local farm produce? You could also visit a local farm or petting zoo and take pictures of each animal to share with the class. Alternatively, take toy tractors, spades and trowels outside to dig together in the mud. Add water to the soil for extra muddiness – don’t forget your wellies!

Memorable experience Farm visit
Innovate challenge The farm shop
CLD Listening and attention; Understanding; Speaking
PD Moving and handling
PSED Self-confidence and self-awareness; Managing feelings and behaviour; Making relationships
English Reading; Writing
Maths Numbers; Shape, space and measures
World The world; Technology
Exp A&D Exploring and using media and materials; Being imaginative

Early Years Foundation Stage Early Learning Goals